10 Best Places to Camp Within Two Hours of Niagara Falls

So you have finally decided to explore all of the wonderful scenery of Niagara Falls and the rest of New York State. In general, it is good to know that “Niagara Falls” is a city on the Niagara River. The city is best known for the actual Niagara Falls, which are on the border with Canada. The well-known Aquarium of Niagara is full of Humboldt penguins, seals and sea lions, and other marine creatures. Other attractions include the Cave of the Winds, Niagara Falls State Park, and Horseshoe Falls.

Niagara Falls has a rich history full of interesting facts, such as daredevils who have dropped over the falls, to inventors such as Nikola Tesla, who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current electricity supply system. The City of Niagara was, in fact, the birthplace of hydroelectric power.

In general, Niagara Falls was formed more than 12,000 years ago at the end of the Ice Age when large torrents of water were released from the melting ice that drained into the Niagara River. The water fell over the edge of the Niagara Escarpment into what is now known as Lewiston, NY. The force of the water wore away the rock layers and Niagara Falls moved upstream until reaching its present location. Every year, the formation continues with the annual freezing and thawing of the Niagara River, along with gradual erosion. Some remedial work has also been done to preserve the Falls and the volume of water has been reduced by diversion for hydroelectric power.

So now that you know a little about the falls, it is time to start planning your trip. If you are looking for a selection of places to camp when you are visiting the Niagara Falls area, you’ll soon find that there are plenty of attractive options available that can fit your specific needs. We’ve compiled a few of our favorite places for camping near the falls, so you can fully enjoy every minute of your trip.

Niagara Falls from USA Landscape View

Being 5 minutes away from Lake Ontario, Niagara Woodland Campground is a great spot for both camping and fishing enthusiasts.

1. Niagara Woodland Campground

This well-forested, family-friendly campground is some of the best Niagara Falls camping, in terms of the types of amenities that are available. Niagara Woodland Campground is only about five minutes from the Canadian border, Lake Ontario in Western New York, and about 25 minutes from the actual falls. This is a tent-heavy campground, which makes it a perfect spot for families, groups, or individuals who are looking for a slightly more secluded experience near the lakeshore.

Niagara Woodland Campground has something for everyone since it offers a pool, a playground, a mini-golf course, horseshoes, as well as volleyball and basketball courts. If you have an RV, it is good to know that there are around 20 RV-only spots that include 30 & 50 amps electricity hookups, as well as water and sewage. The campground also offers a dump site and laundry facilities for families who want to turn the trip into a longer-term stay.

Pros: 

  • Easy access to the falls
  • Many recreation options
  • Good options for tent camping 

Cons: 

  • Large campground, so it can feel crowded
  • Campground caters mostly to families so it is not ideal if you don’t have children

2. Niagara Falls Grand Island KOA

This spectacular Niagara Falls camping destination is just seven miles from the falls. The KOA includes a variety of child-friendly amenities, including a couple of heated pools, a playground, and a very popular inflatable jumping pad. Niagara Falls Grand Island offers both pull-thru and back-in RV sites with 30 & 50 amps electricity along with full hookups. Tent campers can choose from sites with water and electric, water only, or no hookups.

The well-connected staff at this KOA offer several tour packages to Niagara Falls as well as transportation and ticketing information for several of the most popular nearby attractions, including places like Fantasy Island or some of the many surrounding state parks. There are plans to reopen Fantasy Island in the summer of 2021. Some of the initial attractions will include the Silver Comet – the park’s wooden roller coaster, as well as many other kids, family, and thrill rides, which will all make Fantasy Island a world-class regional attraction.

Pros: 

  • A wide range of camping options
  • Tour packages to Niagara Falls
  • Great for kids

Cons: 

  • International tourist destination so it can get crowded 
  • Many of the nearby attractions not yet open

3. Niagara Falls North Lewiston KOA

This is a classic KOA in Youngstown, New York, just about 20 minutes from the falls, and it offers the quintessential Niagara Falls camping experience to RVers and tent campers who are looking for an easy and accommodating stay in the upstate area. The campground includes a pool, gravel sites, firewood for sale, wifi, and even a dog park for your animal companions.

In addition to the onsite amenities, this KOA includes a well-connected host that can arrange tours of Niagara Falls, as well as provide more information on must-see attractions in the surrounding area. There is also a small camp store where you can stock up on firewood and some of the other basic necessities while you are in the campground.

Pros: 

  • A wide range of camping options
  • Good for camping with pets
  • Tour options

Cons: 

  • Can get expensive 
  • Camp store is a bit limited in supply

4. Lazy Lakes Campground

The Lazy Lakes Campground is a family-owned and operated Niagara Falls camping resort in upstate New York. The campground offers everything from swimming pools to fishing, canoeing, and row boating, as well as a full playground area for some of the younger children who might be visiting. There are also lots of good biking opportunities in the area.

There are also 270 RV sites and nine cabins, including sites with 30 & 50 amp electrical hook-ups, along with four restrooms with shower facilities, laundry facilities, dump stations, and full-time security personnel. This 80-acre resort has accommodations to fit everyone’s dream getaway. It is about fifteen minutes to Niagara Falls and ten minutes to the Niagara River and Lake Ontario.

Pros: 

  • A wide range of camping options
  • Very convenient locations
  • Tour options

Cons: 

  • A little expensive
  • Large campground and can get crowded with kids

5. Branches of Niagara Campground

Just between Niagara Falls and Buffalo (around 15 minutes from the falls), the Branches of Niagara Campground offer 80 campsites and 15 cabins. Every site comes with electric hook-ups and they are all in close proximity to the bathrooms and a central laundry facility. There are canoe and kayak rentals available through the general store. Grab a paddle and enjoy some peaceful times on the water or challenge a friend to a race around the lake.

Another fun thing to enjoy is the Outdoor Movie Night, with movies under the stars for the whole family. All movies are family-focused with G and PG ratings. Movies are shown Friday and Sunday nights from mid-June until Labor Day Weekend. Other amenities include three different pools, a mini-golf course, and a brand new playground. This campground is especially good for families with children because it is just a few minutes from Fantasy Land, a popular amusement park in the area. Some other nearby attractions include Elope Niagara’s Little Log Wedding Chapel (3.4 miles), Whirlpool State Park (4.4 miles), and the Niagara Aerospace Museum (4.7 miles).

Pros: 

  • A wide range of camping options
  • Electric hook-ups
  • Close to bathrooms

Cons: 

  • Crowded during the summer
  • Many of the nearby tourist attractions not yet open

6. Niagara Hartland Campground

This is a family-owned and operated RV resort on the shores of little Lake Charles. You will find that this campground is an excellent destination for families and dedicated RVers looking for a place off the beaten path but still in close proximity to Niagara Falls (about a 40-minute drive).

Located in Gasport, New York, Niagara Hartland offers large pull-thru sites with full hookups available, including a few tent sites. The recreation hall offers daily organized activities, and the rental facility offers kayaks and fishing gear for trips out onto the lake. The campground also includes a few hiking trails, its own beach for swimming in Lake Charles, as well as a playground, basketball court, and even some badminton facilities.

Pros: 

  • Large pull-thru sites with full hookups available
  • Tour packages to Niagara Falls
  • Lake access

Cons: 

  • A little far from the falls
  • Lake water can be a little cold

7. Four Mile Creek State Park

As one of the largest campgrounds in the state, Four Mile Creek State Park is a premier destination when it comes to Niagara Falls camping. It is just 15 minutes from the falls, and it offers 275 campsites to choose from. The campground includes 50 amp sites, 30 amp sites, and almost 150 non-electric sites that can be good for both RVs and tent camping. There is a nice little store too within the campground.

As a protected natural area, Four Mile Creek offers up-close views of some of the local flora and fauna, as well as sneak peeks of some of the wildlife native to the area, such as the graceful blue herons and whitetail deer. The park also grants guests access to the massive Lake Ontario, which provides memorable sunset views and all types of water activities.

Pros: 

  • Great wildlife viewing
  • Tour packages to Niagara Falls
  • Camp store

Cons: 

  • Big campground that can get crowded
  • Lake water can be a little cold

8. Niagara Falls State Park

This park has been recognized as the oldest state park in the United States. It contains natural wonders such as the American Falls, the Bridal Veil Falls, and a portion of the Horseshoe Falls. The Observation Tower, at Prospect Point, juts out over Niagara Gorge for a view of all three waterfalls. Trails from the Niagara Gorge Discovery Center will also lead you to many other awesome viewpoints. 

Although there is no overnight camping here, the park does offer a museum, food concession areas, a movie theater with IMAX films, a small gift shop, fireworks displays at certain times of the year, plenty of hiking and nature trails, picnic areas, recreation programs, and even some fishing areas. The Top of the Falls Restaurant, on Goat Island overlooking the Horseshoe Falls, can also be found within the park. 

Pros: 

  • Plenty of trails
  • Fantastic natural scenery
  • Discovery Center

Cons: 

  • No overnight camping
  • Sometimes too crowded

9. Niagara Falls Campground and Lodging

One of the closest of all the campgrounds on this list to Niagara Falls State Park, Niagara Falls Campground, and Lodging can be found just six miles from the thundering falls. This campground offers over 80 campsites, and most of these sites can accommodate RVs or tents.

The campground also includes a pool, a small playground, and a full-service tour center where families and tourists can get the latest information on all of the local attractions and daily excursions that are available in and around Niagara Falls State Park, such as the Hornblower Niagara Cruises Voyage to the Falls Tour.

This 20-minute tour offers a close-up view of the American and Horseshoe falls as well as the amazing Great Gorge. The tour is accompanied by an audio commentary and includes access to the Hornblower Niagara Funicular for panoramic views of the falls. 

You will need to wear the ponchos provided by the company because you will definitely get wet. Tours depart every 15 to 30 minutes throughout the day with evening options from mid-May through mid-October. Tickets start at about $23 for adults and about $15 for children ages 5 to 12. The ride is free for children 4 and younger. The company also offers a special fall fireworks cruise.

Pros: 

  • Large campground with lots of camping options
  • Tour packages to Niagara Falls
  • Great for kids

Cons: 

  • Tours can be expensive
  • Weather on the boat can be a little cold
Yogi Bear Jellystone park camp-resorts in a parade.

Located minutes from Niagara Falls, this Ontario campground features trailer & cottage rentals, cabin rentals, tent sites and RV camping

10. Jellystone Park

This is the closest campsite to the Niagara Falls waterfalls, at just 3.5 miles away. The campsite offers a private shuttle bus service that runs several times a day to the waterfalls. You can camp here, pull up your RV or book a lodge, cabin, or cottage. 

There is a playground, a heated outdoor pool, and a kids splash pool, as well as the world’s largest inflatable waterslide at more than 34 feet tall. There is also a mini-golf course, outdoor movies, family activities, an arcade, and peddle bike rentals. Each campsite has a picnic table and a fire ring. Rates range from $44 a night for no hook-up campsites, to over $300 a night for lodges that can sleep up to eight people.

Pros: 

  • Large campground with lots of camping options
  • Private shuttle bus service to Niagara Falls
  • Lots of amenities for kids

Cons: 

  • Very expensive
  • Can get very crowded at times
Woman drink tea or coffee from a thermos, sitting on camp chair near a waterfall.

Besides campgrounds, Niagara Falls also has many scenic hiking trails.

Visiting the Falls

Most of the campgrounds on this list are open between April through October. Here are some of the average temperatures and the average amount of rainy days each of those months in Niagara Falls, so you know how to pack appropriate clothes for the Niagara Falls weather. 

  • April: 54ºF/12ºC high, 36ºF/2ºC low, 10 days of rain 
  • May: 67ºF/19ºC high, 47ºF/8ºC low, 9 days of rain 
  • June: 76ºF/24ºC high, 57ºF/14ºC low, 8 days of rain 
  • July: 81ºF/27ºC high, 63ºF/17ºC low, 8 days of rain 
  • August: 79ºF/26ºC high, 62ºF/17ºC low, 7 days of rain 
  • September: 70ºF/21ºC high, 55ºF/13ºC low, 9 days of rain 
  • October: 59ºF/15ºC high, 44ºF/7ºC low, 9 days of rain. 

On any trip to Niagara Falls, we suggest that you bring lots of layers and an umbrella, as well as plenty of waterproof clothing. A trip to the incredible Niagara Falls is a “bucket list” experience for many travelers. But knowing where to go and finding out some of the best ways to experience the falls, as well as other attractions in the area, can be quite overwhelming. We suggest that you use these camping spots as starting-off points for the rest of your journey.

Some other interesting places to visit on your trip might include Niagara Glen, Ball’s Falls and Bruce Trail, and the Niagara River Recreation Trail. The Niagara Glen is actually in the Niagara Gorge. Take the stairway through three miles of paths through the Carolinian Forest. Check out prehistoric geological formations, the Niagara River rapids, and the Niagara River Whirlpool. The Niagara Glen is surrounded by all kinds of indigenous plants and flowers that can be especially wonderful during spring and summer. 

The Bruce Trail is an ancient marked footpath. If you’re into hiking, you should definitely check this out because it leads to Ball’s Falls, which is actually two waterfalls, as well as a collection of historic buildings and a few more nature trails. The whole area has been restored with an early 1800s atmosphere and you’ll be able to visit an operating flour mill, a blacksmith shop, and many more attractions. 

The Niagara River Recreation Trail is an enjoyable trail for the whole family because it features about 35 miles of paved paths. It actually passes right through the City of Niagara Falls, so you can enjoy some of the urban life on your Niagara Falls camping trip. There are four scenic sections that will take you about an hour or two to explore at a leisurely pace.

Camping at Niagara Falls can be great fun with a group of people of all age levels. Nature enthusiasts can really get into greater knowledge about everything from the local bugs in the area or even the types of trees that are most commonly found. Niagara Falls is truly a destination where you can make the most of your camping trip and your time outdoors.

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Riley Draper

Riley Draper

Riley Draper is a writer and entrepreneur from Chattanooga, Tennessee. As a world traveler, he has been to more than fifty countries and hiked some of the most elusive trails in the world. He is the co-founder of WeCounsel Solutions and has published work in both national and global outlets, including the Times Free Press, Patch, and Healthcare Global. When he's not writing, he's probably on a hiking trip or climbing in the mountains.